Longleaf Pine from the Southeast U.S. was shipped North in large volume after the Civil War, becoming the backbone of the industrial revolution, through the thousands of mills, warehouses and factories it framed during the era – and its from those same buildings where it’s recovered today. Uncommon in its hardness, the wood is most commonly milled into flooring, though has been versatile for a broad range of applications from cabinets and doors to stair treads and tables.

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Application

Flooring

Thickness

3/4"

Widths

2"-4"

Lengths

3 - 14'

Color and Surface

Longleaf Pine (Comb grade) is characterized by rich amber tones and a striking uneven and dense grain, containing up to twenty-five growth rings per inch. Our old growth longleaf contains over 95% heartwood content, and is primarily quarter-sawn at narrow widths under from 4-5” in width. The most refined grade of ‘heart’ pine, there is the rare knot and nail hole.  

Nature and Culture

Longleaf was overlooked in the North until the late 1800’s, when the end of the Civil war, the Industrial Revolution, massive immigration and depletion of Northern forests lead to large scale logging in the South. The highest volume of wood was used for framing commercial buildings, but a refined and narrow vertical grain cut of the wood – popularly known as ‘comb grade’ – was common for row houses.

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